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1971 Doors Contract Amendment


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#1 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 08:43 AM

Of all the information that has come out from this recent trial for the heart and soul of The Doors this bit makes me most uncomfortable.

Sub Section 11 Amendment to the Old Doors Partnership Agreement March 11th 1971

”On March 11th 1971 the parties executed a one page amendment to the Old Doors Partnership Agreement. It sets forth a specific provision prohibiting the use of the name, The Doors, by any partner upon termination of the partnership for any reason other than the death of a partner. The amendment was prompted by a concern that after L.A. Woman was delivered to Elektra, Morrison might leave the band and form another band in Europe using the name 'The Doors.'
Manzarek testified that he signed the one-page amendment when it was prepared but did not read it and did not understand its purpose.
Abe Somer testified that he recalled some concern about the band splintering, and that the amendment, as well as all of the band's agreements, were explained to the band members before they signed."
The court found Mr. Somers' testimony to be credible and accepts it as true."

From Pt III Statement of facts….
Proposed Statement of Decision
By Judge Gregory Alarcon May 2005


I would be interested to know whose idea this shabby bookend to The Doors career was in the first place and also more than interested to know what prompted this distrust of Morrison and the subsequent shackling of him to prevent him forming a Brit version of the Doors when he moved to Europe.

If we examine the judges comments it at first glance seems that Ray was in the clear as he did not have a clue what the document was when he signed it as he did not read it at all. A bit odd I have to say for a guy with a degree in economics.
So from that it seems that Robby and John went behind Jim and Rays backs and thought this shameful document up. But as we all know as Doors fans Robby was a tad shy and it would seem to be a total sea-change for him to suddenly do something like that….so it must have been the dastardly drummer who never liked Jim in the first place……but if we examine further we see Abe Somer The Doors lawyer (described fondly as a pit-bull lawyer by Elektra boss Jac Holzman) testified that he explained this document to all four Doors before they signed it. And the judge made the point that Abe’s testimony was found credible and true whilst Ray’s was not.
And as Ray and Jim were the most extrovert members of The Doors it would seem more credible that Ray had a hand in this as well as the other two if not was the instigator himself.
The only other explanations are that the lawyers thought it up for a laff and conned The Doors into signing it under the guise of getting autographs for their kids or Jim thought it might be a good idea to make sure he did not stab the other three in the back when he got to Paris. Which don’t seem too credible do they.
So we are left with the musical side of the Doors not trusting the lyrical side to stay loyal to the band when he went for a few months rest in Europe.
Lets examine the matter of loyalty for a moment shall we.

The lyrical side

1)The lyrical side was asked early in The Doors career to ditch the musical side and go solo by the bands then manager. So what does the lyrical side do? He goes to the musical side and tells them what’s gone on and they get a new manager.

2)The lyrical side decides that jealousies within the band might rear their ugly heads and arguments about who wrote what would cause major disruptions. So he brings up the idea that all 4 band members share everything the band makes equally. For the major if not sole songwriter in the group at that time it was an outstanding piece of foresight born of integrity and a belief in the music against all the cash he could have raked in off his song writing royalties.

The musical side

3)The musical side flog Light My Fire to Buick for a few grand apiece without consulting the lyrical side. Who then threatens to smash up a Buick live on stage if they don’t stop the deal.

4)This 1971 amendment to the current Doors contract.

So weighing everything up we find the musical side sadly lacking on the loyalty front whilst the lyrical side did the right thing by the band.
True Jim was a drunk who managed to bugger up whole tours with his refusal to chain his mouth shut. True he was not the most reliable in the studio and caused all the major problems The Doors ever had. But one thing he never did (as far as we know) was stab his band-mates in the back. Which was what this document saw the light of day to prevent.
So is there some information about Jim in 1970-1971 that we are not privy to that gave rise to this distrust or is this just a shabby chapter in the death throes of a great band who were realising that their career was about to end as their lead singer rode off into the sunset to go to Europe…perhaps forever.

To be honest this is a bit more information than I ever wished to know. I am happy it served its purpose in winning the trial for the side of integrity but now that I know of its existence I find my all time musical icons are not quite as unique as I used to think.
Knowledge is not always our friend …just like alcohol!

#2 Guest_Stuart_*

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 09:04 AM

It's THAT document which sickened me of Manzarek, Jim did not deserve that as surely the other 3 knew jim was going to paris to rest and write poetry, what does john think of signing that bit of paper now?.

#3 beatNick

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 09:19 AM

There's things about Ray that have turned me off at times (the one the finger gets pointed at), but Jim didn't have to sign it. No one outside the band either knows what it would have been like to be in that situation, wondering what the future  holds, and seeing Jim destructing. I just have a hard time believing they would have thought he'd run off and start a Doors band - maybe it just made them feel secure in that he'd be back at some point and they'd create some more art together -

#4 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 10:41 AM

QUOTE(beatNick @ Aug 7 2005, 05:19 PM)
There's things about Ray that have turned me off at times (the one the finger gets pointed at), but Jim didn't have to sign it. No one outside the band either knows what it would have been like to be in that situation, wondering what the future  holds, and seeing Jim destructing. I just have a hard time believing they would have thought he'd run off and start a Doors band - maybe it just made them feel secure in that he'd be back at some point and they'd create some more art together -

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No he didn't but thats not the point of my post whether or not he had to sign it.
My point is that this document was even thought of in the first place.
Who signed it is irrelevant to what i am saying.
What did Jim do to deserve this distrust and who's idea was it is what i am asking. smile.gif

#5 OcarinaGirl

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 04:28 PM

Ignorance of the law is no excuse, first of all.

When you got a cow that gives milk for free, you don't want to let it go, do you?

Jim probably didn't do anything to deserve distrust and it was probably the idea of the "bean counters" or some such to make sure the golden goose didn't get to fly away.

But die away he did....

#6 Ensenada

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 08:57 AM

if the document had to be explained to ALL parties, then whos idea was it in the first place? i know we discussed this on scorpy and whatnot, but thinking about it....we came to the conclusion that probably ray, robbie and john decided on it. but is it possible that the management of the doors created it then and explained it the band...

#7 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 10:11 AM

QUOTE(Ensenada @ Aug 8 2005, 04:57 PM)
if the document had to be explained to ALL parties, then whos idea was it in the first place? i know we discussed this on scorpy and whatnot, but thinking about it....we came to the conclusion that probably ray, robbie and john decided on it. but is it possible that the management of the doors created it then and explained it the band...

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Sounds like a nice tidy explanation but Bill Siddons would not have had the power to just think up something like that on his own. And as this was an amendment to the Doors contract and not their record contract its unlikely Elektra would have thought it up as they would have been happy to deal with a Jim led Doors UK and also what was left of the band in what form they took.
So the only conclusion is one or more 'Door/s' thought this up and the reference Abe Somer makes is to the fact that the legalese of the document was explained to all 4 including the one or ones whose idea it was as they would need to understand the legality of it as well as those who were not in at its inception.
'sorry guv it wasn't us' is not an excuse the band can use.....
Someone in the band suspected Morrison might swan off to Europe and link up with a few Brits (I say Brits as France was not known for its rock musicians in 1971) and call his band The Doors. And that someone possibly in collusion with another someone or someones in the band and possibly Bill Siddons got Abe Somer and his team to draw this one page up for the sole purpose of preventing that possibility happening.
The someone in question would most likely have had a first name John, Ray or Robby......
Unless of course it was all Jim's idea and he suspected himself of such a shabby trick and being ultra loyal to the band, as he had always shown himself to be, made sure he could not go to Europe and shit on the other three.....
Mind boggling innit! laugh.gif

#8 knowidea

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 12:47 PM

The fact that Jim signed it may suggest he thought of it.....as a way to erase doubt.  Otherwise, it seems if this was thrown in front of Jim's face, he would have had anger issues over the lack of trust and said no way in hell.  Ahhh...speculation.

QUOTE(TheWallsScreamedPoetry @ Aug 8 2005, 06:11 PM)
Sounds like a nice tidy explanation but Bill Siddons would not have had the power to just think up something like that on his own. And as this was an amendment to the Doors contract and not their record contract its unlikely Elektra would have thought it up as they would have been happy to deal with a Jim led Doors UK and also what was left of the band in what form they took.
So the only conclusion is one or more 'Door/s' thought this up and the reference Abe Somer makes is to the fact that the legalese of the document was explained to all 4 including the one or ones whose idea it was as they would need to understand the legality of it as well as those who were not in at its inception.
'sorry guv it wasn't us' is not an excuse the band can use.....
Someone in the band suspected Morrison might swan off to Europe and link up with a few Brits (I say Brits as France was not known for its rock musicians in 1971) and call his band The Doors. And that someone possibly in collusion with another someone or someones in the band and possibly Bill Siddons got Abe Somer and his team to draw this one page up for the sole purpose of preventing that possibility happening.
The someone in question would most likely have had a first name John, Ray or Robby......
Unless of course it was all Jim's idea and he suspected himself of such a shabby trick and being ultra loyal to the band, as he had always shown himself to be, made sure he could not go to Europe and shit on the other three.....
Mind boggling innit! laugh.gif

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#9 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 12:56 PM

QUOTE(knowidea @ Aug 8 2005, 08:47 PM)
The fact that Jim signed it may suggest he thought of it.....as a way to erase doubt.  Otherwise, it seems if this was thrown in front of Jim's face, he would have had anger issues over the lack of trust and said no way in hell.  Ahhh...speculation.

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I suppose thats one way for the other three to assuage their guilt  ....blame it on the dead bloke.... laugh.gif  laugh.gif

#10 OcarinaGirl

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 04:30 PM

QUOTE(TheWallsScreamedPoetry @ Aug 8 2005, 03:56 PM)
I suppose thats one way for the other three to assuage their guilt  ....blame it on the dead bloke.... laugh.gif  laugh.gif

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It's got management written all over it; and by the looks of the signers, Mr. Ray, had a hand in it, if you ask me.

#11 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 01:09 AM

QUOTE(OcarinaGirl @ Aug 29 2005, 12:30 AM)
It's got management written all over it; and by the looks of the signers, Mr. Ray, had a hand in it, if you ask me.

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Well Doors management at that time was Bill Siddons who according to Ray (page 13/14 of LMF) 'was ostensibly our manager, he was a roadie and we promoted him to phone answerer but wouldn't you know it.... it went to his head. He became arrogant. Lording it over concert promoters and writers requesting interviews. But what the hell...he was trustworthy.'
Doesn't sound like Bill would have been able to make any decision like THAT one now does it!
The only people who could have come up with something like that were the band members and as it was basically an idea to prevent Jim stealing the name in Europe it's not likely Jim thought of it now is it.  smile.gif

#12 The Keys

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 11:50 AM

thanks for the info, I didn't know anything about this. and I'm not really sure I understood it correctly but it's interesting.

I don't think Jim would ever use the name The Doors in Europe because he wouldn't betray all the music and lyrics he had done with those 3 people. It wouldn't surprise me if it had been Jim who proposed to sign this document as a way to slap anyone who had insinuated that he could ever do such a thing. It's quite possible that Jim, realizing people were being malicious, proposed to sign this document as a way of saying: I won't betray you, this is the proof. And I'll slap your face if you ever suggest that I'd lost the little integrity that I have left

does this make any sense?
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#13 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 01:28 AM

QUOTE(The Keys @ Aug 31 2005, 07:50 PM)
thanks for the info, I didn't know anything about this. and I'm not really sure I understood it correctly but it's interesting.

I don't think Jim would ever use the name The Doors in Europe because he wouldn't betray all the music and lyrics he had done with those 3 people. It wouldn't surprise me if it had been Jim who proposed to sign this document as a way to slap anyone who had insinuated that he could ever do such a thing. It's quite possible that Jim, realizing people were being malicious, proposed to sign this document as a way of saying: I won't betray you, this is the proof. And I'll slap your face if you ever suggest that I'd lost the little integrity that I have left

does this make any sense?
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It makes sense but most likely never happened. Thats the sort of thing Jim could have done to show his distrustful bandmates that he did not have the slightest intention of stabbing them in the back the way they did him over the Buick ad.
But considering Jim had so much on his mind at the time....he was facing a jail sentence after all in Raiford Prison which is nicknamed 'The Rock'
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More likely he was presented with this amendment and signed it because he quite frankly no longer gave a damn.
Everything I have ever read points me to the conclusion Jim Morrison was never coming back to be a Door anyway....regardless of his phone call to John.....the contract amendment was just another kick in the teeth while the man was down on the floor and a truly shameful piece of paper the other three ought to be truly ashamed of!
But as Jim once said to friends after the Buick fiasco he now had business partners not friends and bandmates.  sad.gif

#14 The Keys

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 10:57 AM

QUOTE(TheWallsScreamedPoetry @ Sep 1 2005, 09:28 AM)
It makes sense but most likely never happened. Thats the sort of thing Jim could have done to show his distrustful bandmates that he did not have the slightest intention of stabbing them in the back the way they did him over the Buick ad.
But considering Jim had so much on his mind at the time....he was facing a jail sentence after all in Raiford Prison which is nicknamed 'The Rock'
user posted image

More likely he was presented with this amendment and signed it because he quite frankly no longer gave a damn.
Everything I have ever read points me to the conclusion Jim Morrison was never coming back to be a Door anyway....regardless of his phone call to John.....the contract amendment was just another kick in the teeth while the man was down on the floor and a truly shameful piece of paper the other three ought to be truly ashamed of!
But as Jim once said to friends after the Buick fiasco he now had business partners not friends and bandmates.  sad.gif

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I don't know Walls Screamed, but it feels to me like this might have been Jim's idea. And who would he be attacking with such an attitude like that? Ray Manzarek of course - maybe Ray insinuated something Jim didn't like. Just my intuition, I don't know.

That Rock place looks horrible.

#15 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 05:05 AM

It certainly does Ana..... laugh.gif

Bringing this thread back into the public eye as part of the Legacy discussion.

Here are a few other interesting snippets from the Statement Of Decision from July 21 2005 STATEMENT OF FACTS section.

2. The Creation Of The Doors

In 1965, Morrison, Densmore, Manzarek and Krieger formed a band called The Doors. Manzarek and Morrison met in film school at UCLA. Densmore and Krieger had been friends in high school. Manzarek met Densmore and Krieger while attending meditation classes in Southern California and introduced Morrison to Krieger and Densmore. At the time, Morrison had received his bachelor’s degree from UCLA, Manzarek had a bachelor’s degree in economics from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois and had also received a master’s degree from UCLA in film school. Densmore and Krieger had attended some college, but did not qualify for an undergraduate degree.


3. The Doors Decide To Share Royalties Equally

In 1966, Morrison, Densmore, Manzarek and Krieger began performing publicity as The Doors. They filed a fictitious business statement. The Doors was a unique band in rock and roll history, not only for its memorable music, or the iconic superstar status and image of Morrison memorialized on T-Shirts and posters, but also for the band members’ egalitarian treatment of each other.
For example, while Morrison was generally know as the poet/songwriter who wrote haunting lyrics, the band’s most famous song, “Light My Fire,” was actually written by Robby Krieger. Jim Morrison had a unique baritone voice and a gift for creating poetic lyrics, but each member of the group possessed a special talent that made the group unique. Manzarek had a vision fro the direction of the group, given his eclectic musical background in classical, jazz, and rock music and his gift of musical arrangement. His impressive educational background, including a bachelors degree in economics from DePaul, as well as a master’s degree in film studies from UCLA, coupled with the fact that he was older than the other members and a talented public speaker, made him the perfect spokesperson for the group. Krieger wrote many of the Doors songs and his mastery of the guitar reflected the influence of jazz, blues, rock and flamenco.

Densmore, the drummer and youngest member of the band, had a broad knowledge of jazz and rock styles. He also had a gift for arrangement, which he shared with Manzarek and Krieger. The Doors first single record, “Break On Through,” the subject of various causes of action in these consolidated actions relating to its possible licensing for a Cadillac commercial, is instantly recognizable by Densmore’s unique bossa nova drumming introducing the song.

Unlike other musical groups, wherein the songwriters carefully protect and insist on their music royalties based on their individual song writing and never share those royalties with the other band members who did not write the songs. The Doors were unique. Given the special talents of all of the members, in the spirit of unity, or as canny tactic to maintain harmony among the group, The Doors’ policy was to share equally all song writing credits, regardless of who wrote the music or the lyrics. Throughout the trial, Densmore poetically described each individual band member as a “facet of a diamond.”

Ray Manzarek described the unique relationship of the group as follows,
“See, here is the way it worked with The Doors. There are four guys in the band; each person is as essential as anybody else in the band. The drums are as important as the words. The words are as important as the guitar. The guitar is as important as the keyboard bass guy.
Each thing contributed its 25 percent……We each had our area of expertise. That was one quarter of the pie. You remove any one of those quarters and you don’t have anything.”
Ray Manzarek, The Doors Myth and Reality, The Spoken Word History, Audio CD (Monstersounds, 1996) (Side Two, “Making The Magic Circle”)

In 1966, Max Fink served as legal counsel to the band when it entered into a recording contract with Elektra Records. The Elektra Records agreement was for six albums. The band was an immediate success. It was ultimately one of the most successful bands of all time.

The band’s first business manager and accountant was Robert Greene. He continued in that capacity until 1984. Since that time Jerry Swartz has been the business manager and accountant for The Doors. Not long after the Elektra contract was executed, Abraham Somer served as the band’s counsel. Somer continued until approximately 1984, when Gary Stiffleman and John Branca replaced him. Stiffleman continues to be the primary legal counsel for The Doors.


4. Abraham Somer Secures Publishing Rights From Elektra, and the Creation Of The Doors Music Publishing

In 1969, Somer secured from Elektra, all of the publishing rights to The Doors’ music. That same year, Somer created a partnership for Morrison, Densmore, Manzarek, and Krieger called Doors Music Company. The terms of the partnership were reflected in a written agreement signed by the four band members (hereinafter “DMC” or the “DMC Partnership”) The DMC Partnership was executed on February 8, 1969. Paragraph 6 of the DMC Partnership provided that management of the partnership would be decided by unanimous agreement of the parties.

At trial, Densmore, Somer, and Green testified that governance by unanimous agreement was consistent with the manner in which the band had conducted itself since its inception. Stiffleman and Swartz testified that unanimity was the rule of governance among The Doors’ members and that with respect to any significant opportunity to license music by the Doors, any member of The Doors had a right to veto any such proposal.

Something Ray denied as a Myth during his testimony.

5. The Buick Car Commercial

In 1969, The Doors experienced perhaps their most significant internal rift involving the question of whether the group should sell its music for use in a car commercial. Manzarek, Krieger, and Densmore agreed that Buick should be allowed to use the hit song, “Light My Fire” in a television commercial for a the new Buick Opel automobile. Because Morrison was unavailable for reasons never clarified during the trial, the other band members gave consent. Several days later, Morrison learned of the decision and was furious. He believed that his partners had reneged on the rule of unanimity of failing to abide by ‘one for all, all for one,’ and had “sold out” to corporate America, “the Devil.” Light My Fire at 305-307. Morrison was so angry that he threatened to destroy an Opel on stage during the group’s future performances, and insisted that Somer rescind the agreement with Buick. The commercial was never aired, and apparently the band members never received any compensation.

Morrison sought the names of other lawyers from Somer to consult about possible legal action against his partners, but never initiated any legal action. On November 11, 1970, the DMC Partnership Agreement was amended to require that any decisions about licensing music require a unanimous vote signed by all of the partners.

From 1966 to the date of Morrison’s death, the Doors were a huge success, performing throughout the United States as well as abroad, selling millions of dollars worth of albums and merchandise. An no time prior to Morrison’s death did the band formally register the name The Doors with any state or federal agency.

(NOTE: Ray Manzarek characterized this incident in his autobiography as a “fiasco.” Manzarek, Light My Fire, My Life With The Doors (Putnam’s Son, 1998 at 305)

(NOTE: At trial, Manzarek said Morrison also objected to the commercial because his father drove a Buick.)

(NOTE: The testimony of various witnesses during the trial was not consistent as to whether a commercial ever aired, whether all the money was returned, whether money was paid to halt the agreement and other details as to how this commercial was stopped.)


Jac Holzman writes in Follow The Music that an advert did air on US TV but was pulled likely as a result of Jim's objection to it.
Ray takes a very sinister turn during this trial when he claims that Morrison objected because his dad drove a Buick. Taking away the principled stand of a true artist and reducing him to a silly little boy with a daddy complex.

8. Morrison Decides To Leave For France

In early 1971, Morrison announced to his fellow band members that he was going to move for a short time to Paris, France with Pamela Courson. He intended to leave for Paris shortly after the band finished recording their sixth album for Elektra, L.A. Woman.


9. The DMC Partnership Agreement Entered Into In March 1971, Effective As Of January 1, 1966.

At about the time, Somer prepared a partnership agreement for the Doors, for all purposes except music publishing. In March 1971, the four members of The Doors executed their written partnership agreement, effective January 1, 1966 (hereinafter the “Old Doors Agreement”). Somer testified that he explained the “Old Doors Agreement” to the four members of The Doors, and that it reflected the way the partnership had operated by oral agreement up until the time of its execution. It provided for unanimous agreement in the management of the business of the Doors.


10. The Administration Agreement Entered Into On March 8, 1971

On March 8, 1971, in anticipation of Morrison leaving the United States, The Doors entered into an Administration Agreement with Greene, their business manager, granting him exclusive authority to enter into licensing agreements for music of The Doors. However, to avoid what had happened in 1969 with regard to the Buick Commerical incident Greene was empowered to sign agreements for television and radio commercials only after receiving the written approval of all four partners. As of the date for the execution of the Administration Agreement, no Doors music was authorized to used for radio or television commercials. Densmore, Manzarek and Krieger all testified that while Morrison was alive, The Doors did not intend to authorize use of its music in radio or television commercials.



13. The New Partnership Agreement For The Surviving Members Of The Doors October 1, 1971

On October 1, 1971, Somer registered a new recording contract between Elektra and the three surviving members of the Doors for five albums, at a minimum guaranty of $250,000 per album. The three surviving band members continued performing without replacing Jim Morrison with another vocalist, choosing to sing vocals themselves. On October 1, 1971, a new written partnership agreement was entered into between among Densmore, Manzarek and Krieger for purposes of performing and recording as The Doors (hereinafter the “New Doors” partnership agreement.) The New Doors partnership agreement continued the unanimous agreement provision. In addition, the New Doors partnership agreement continued the same provision set forth in the earlier and recently signed one-page amendment to the Original Old Doors partnership agreement, namely that in the event of a termination of the partnership for any reason other than the death of a partner, none of the partners could use the name The Doors. It also provided that in the event of the termination of the partnership because of the death of a partner, the remaining partners might perform together but not separately using the name The Doors. Like the prior two written partnership agreements, the New Doors partnership was terminable at will by any partner.

While no written license permitting the three surviving members to use the name The Doors for recording and performing purposes was produced at trial, Manzarek, Kreiger and Densmore used the name without objection from Pamela Courson. She did not object to their activities although she was aware of the performances and recordings by the new band and saw them in Sausalito, California. No evidence was produced at the trial that there was any objection by anyone to the three surviving band members using the name The Doors for recording and performing purposes.


These little insights are interesting as they give a feel into the way the former 4 sided diamond had become less so after the Buick episode. The idea that Morrison was even considering suing his own band an indictment as to the fragile state of the relationship and probably a precursor to the events of March 1971 and the infamous contract amendment to prevent Jim swanning off with the name.

#16 mewsical

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 07:25 AM

I've never believed that Ray Manzarek, obviously a well-educated man, simply signed a piece of paper waved in his face by his very own lawyer, without knowing EXACTLY what it represented.  

I've been chatting with an old friend/colleague from Elektra, and he has told me that he personally auditioned a LOT of vocalists with an eye to replacing Jim.  This was before Jim died, btw.  He was simply in Paris.

#17 Guest_TheWallsScreamedPoetry_*

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 07:35 AM

QUOTE (mewsical @ May 24 2010, 08:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I've been chatting with an old friend/colleague from Elektra, and he has told me that he personally auditioned a LOT of vocalists with an eye to replacing Jim.  This was before Jim died, btw.  He was simply in Paris.


That’s interesting Sally.
Adds a bit more weight to the comments Bill Siddons made to the Steve Hoffman forum that Jim had left The Doors and the band was seeking a replacement.
This is exactly the kind of info that fans need to be able to dispel the old Myths and examine the Doors, their Legacy and their place in the new century Pantheon of music.
Are you in any way able to expand further on this? smile.gif


There are two ways of looking at this contract amendment in relation to Morrison's leaving of The Doors.
Was this a reaction to his announcement that he was in fact leaving the band?
Was his leaving the band a consequence of being presented with this rather distrustful display by his three partners.

This thread can be viewed as part of the Legacy thread here which is worth further reading.
The Doors Legacy?, ....not the stupid album but rather the concept!

#18 mewsical

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 06:46 PM

QUOTE (TheWallsScreamedPoetry @ May 24 2010, 08:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That’s interesting Sally.
Adds a bit more weight to the comments Bill Siddons made to the Steve Hoffman forum that Jim had left The Doors and the band was seeking a replacement.
This is exactly the kind of info that fans need to be able to dispel the old Myths and examine the Doors, their Legacy and their place in the new century Pantheon of music.
Are you in any way able to expand further on this? smile.gif


There are two ways of looking at this contract amendment in relation to Morrison's leaving of The Doors.
Was this a reaction to his announcement that he was in fact leaving the band?
Was his leaving the band a consequence of being presented with this rather distrustful display by his three partners.

This thread can be viewed as part of the Legacy thread here which is worth further reading.
The Doors Legacy?, ....not the stupid album but rather the concept!


I'll certainly follow up. But it was pretty common knowledge around the label that Jim was leaving the band at the time.  The remaining members of the Doors, by signing this contract amendment, were simply protecting the name, I guess, and Jim concurred because he wanted out.  Imo, just based on various conversations with Jim at that time, he could put together a band simply based on his name, if he wanted to.  At that point, and after the Buick debacle, it was apparent to him that the Doors had reached a crossroads, and Jim felt he could take things from there, at least as far as his solo career was concerned.  He left them to squabble about a band that could not be the Doors without him.

As I have always maintained, you can't replace Jim Morrison.  He was unique.  Colleague agreed.



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Posted 25 May 2010 - 12:24 AM

QUOTE (mewsical @ May 24 2010, 07:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As I have always maintained, you can't replace Jim Morrison.  He was unique.  Colleague agreed.

I would doubt any Doors fan that knows his or her onions would disagree with that. Jim Morrison certainly could not be replaced but that did not mean The Doors could not have continued and evolved with a new singer.
When Howard Werth was announced in 1973 I was excited about that and still feel a slight pang that it never came to pass. But probably the right decision was taken and the band folded.


QUOTE (mewsical @ May 24 2010, 07:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'll certainly follow up. But it was pretty common knowledge around the label that Jim was leaving the band at the time.  The remaining members of the Doors, by signing this contract amendment, were simply protecting the name, I guess, and Jim concurred because he wanted out.  Imo, just based on various conversations with Jim at that time, he could put together a band simply based on his name, if he wanted to.  At that point, and after the Buick debacle, it was apparent to him that the Doors had reached a crossroads, and Jim felt he could take things from there, at least as far as his solo career was concerned.  He left them to squabble about a band that could not be the Doors without him.

I doubt Jim was a willing participant in this bit of disloyalty as he had never shown any to The Doors and must have been pretty pissed it was shown to him. As you say Jim could easily have attracted top class musicians to play any music he wished to pursue but I for one doubt he would have used The Doors name for it.

It goes further than protecting the name Mewsy as since Morrison's death these three have been conning their public about the state of Morrison as regards him being a Door. His friends seem to think he had left the band as he told them so. Even his new pals in Paris thought that. As you say it was common knowledge in Elektra circles and the bands manager admitted it in an interview but as a fan around since 1971 I have never seen or heard any of The Doors mention that Jim had left The Doors. And you have to wonder why? Are they in denial or are they simply protecting their investment by keeping the Myth together that all was peachy in The Doors world except for a few problems with drink that may well have been solved on Jim's return for the triumphant follow up album and tour.
Robby Krieger was sticking to the official mantra as recently as 2007. Which we all know was the fake 40th anniversary of The Doors and a very lucrative period. They must feel that the truth might damage sales and perception might change if the fans of Morrison's leather trousers found out what a bunch of disloyal bastards they really were.
"No, he never quit the band. When Jim left for Paris (in 1971), the three of us kept writing stuff. We fully expected him to come back."
Herald Tribune - Sarasota Florida Sunday, January 21 2007


I hope you do follow up on this Sally as this is an avenue Doors fans have been denied information on for so long that maybe it's time we found out some actual truth about the matter. We see with the amendment how defensive these three are. Hoping it will go away and be forgotten and never once referring to it in interviews even those concerning the trial. Must be seen as a very damaging document and the testimony surrounding this will also be very illuminating. They are fortunate that control of official forums is so hard line as it's been kept away from all but this place.  Very few know even the tiny bit of factual information we can produce here.
Discussion discouraged anywhere but here.
All the great forums are gone now so basically The Three Amigos have weathered any storm that was begun outside official control.
Jim's leaving or not of the band the relationship between him and the band by 1971.
Why they did not visit Pere Lachaise on May 1st 1972 when in Paris.
Lots of questions but no answers without more information.





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