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Jim Morrison and depression


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#1 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 08:49 AM

It's clear that Jim Morrison suffered from depression,many great artists use these dark feelings to further there art,but after a while it catches up with them.Self medication is what most undiagnosed individuals do,alcohol,cocaine,pills.In Jim's case he abused alcohol and alcohol is a depressant so in effect the more you use the worse you get.I've always had a soft spot in my heart for the moment in all the Doors books when Morrison say's "I think I'm having a nervous breakdown" it makes me sad that he was so helpless against these depression demons,he more than likely was having a panic attack when he thought he was having a nervous breakdown,but here's this highly intelligent man left to his own devices to get through a nightmare scenario of depression,alcohol abuse and performing most of the time on a functional level,delivering what he promised to his band mates and himself.

#2 Next Little Girl

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 09:02 AM

QUOTE (mojosmoothy @ May 26 2009, 05:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It's clear that Jim Morrison suffered from depression,many great artists use these dark feelings to further there art,but after a while it catches up with them.Self medication is what most undiagnosed individuals do,alcohol,cocaine,pills.In Jim's case he abused alcohol and alcohol is a depressant so in effect the more you use the worse you get.I've always had a soft spot in my heart for the moment in all the Doors books when Morrison say's "I think I'm having a nervous breakdown" it makes me sad that he was so helpless against these depression demons,he more than likely was having a panic attack when he thought he was having a nervous breakdown,but here's this highly intelligent man left to his own devices to get through a nightmare scenario of depression,alcohol abuse and performing most of the time on a functional level,delivering what he promised to his band mates and himself.



Yes Tim,

Maybe he even had undiagnosed Bi-polar, in his day known as Manic Depression, which would account for the bouts of mania as well. Also, drugs and alcohol are not good for the body and mind, eventually this all leads to a troubled soul and spirit suppression. Ah, a poem in the making..

Spirit Suppresants

Crash

Feel the soul within

Break

Light another

Smoke

Have another

Toke

Drink another

Coke

It's all the same game

Jack

It's all such a shame

Crack

Lying high,

Not flying high

Flack

& in the end

Smack

Your hitting

The porcelain god

Whack



~Sheri Lynne

#3 GG Morrison

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:07 AM

In Jim's case, though, it's hard to tell which came first, the drinking or the depression, IF that's what he would have
been diagnosed with.  He'd probably been drinking since high school, so who knows when exactly the alcohol
became, for him,  the buffer for the pain of depression or insecurity.  Later, he and his friends were getting
hammered regularly with other drugs, which can intensify emotional highs and lows.  He would have to have gotten
off everything for some time before an accurate diagnosis could be made.

#4 jym

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:23 AM

I've long thought Morrison suffered depression. When I read about how he wrote People Are Strange, he was all bummed out until he went off by himself to watch the sunset (or something, I think this may be from John's book) but a little while later he comes back all hyped up and excited with the lyrics to People Are Strange. I've had experiences like that myself. I wonder how intrinsic being somewhat depressive is to introspection and the creative process???

Morrison was drinking since being a teenager. I think in No One Here (or maybe BOT) one of his friends tells of Morrison copping a six pack (as we all did at that age), and there's another (definitely in BOT) where they go into Jim's father's study & have some scotch.

There's also a book Living In The Dead Zone: Janis Joplin & Jim Morrison & it's about borderline personality disorder & includes ficitonalized psychiatric interviews with Jim & Janis. The interviews are pretty thin they advance the author's theories but it's obvious he only has a basic understanding of the facts of both Jim's & Janis' lives.

#5 mewsical

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:28 AM

Jim was not bipolar, he was a drunk.  Pretty simple explanation.  He could apparently put away quite a lot, remain in control, and then suddenly slip into this other personality.  It's a medical condition.

Even if he wasn't in a mild depression to begin with, the alcohol, LSD, downers and so on, were certainly contributory.

#6 GG Morrison

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:45 AM

QUOTE (mewsical @ May 26 2009, 01:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Jim was not bipolar, he was a drunk.  Pretty simple explanation.  He could apparently put away quite a lot, remain in control, and then suddenly slip into this other personality.  It's a medical condition.

Even if he wasn't in a mild depression to begin with, the alcohol, LSD, downers and so on, were certainly contributory.

That's what we were wondering, which came first: the inability to cope with certain things and
the resulting self-medicating, or did long-time alcohol abuse kill that coping part of his psyche?  

I know this for a fact: when you're hurting, you'll try just about any damn thing to stop it.   sad.gif


#7 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 11:01 AM

LSD also may be at the center of this depression,some people are given LSD by Doctors to stop drinking and others who take LSD go on to be alcholics,LSD on a constant basis can bring on a major chemical imbalance leading to depression,so Jim played all the cards.Also Hendrix was a manic depressive,besides Joplin.Go figure.

#8 Sojo Rise

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 11:28 AM

QUOTE (GG Morrison @ May 26 2009, 10:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's what we were wondering, which came first: the inability to cope with certain things and
the resulting self-medicating, or did long-time alcohol abuse kill that coping part of his psyche?  

I know this for a fact: when you're hurting, you'll try just about any damn thing to stop it.   sad.gif



Coming from someone who spent most of the weekend drinking, I can attest to this fact.
This weekend was pure hell.

I've resisted the bipolar diagnosis for sometime until recently, preferring a simpler diagnosis of
just being depressed along with ADD, which contrary to popular belief does not end with the
onset of adulthood.  So I've accepted it along with the mood stabilizers they want to prescribe

I'm sure my drinking is somewhat contra-indicated somewhat, so be it. I've never been the kind of drinker
Jim was which Al Graham said was the type who would get in the morning and drink three scotch
drinks just to calm his nerves and face the day. I don't know true that is. I do know I don't
drink during the day ever, and may end the night with no drink, 1 drink or 5 drinks depending on how
my day went.

I'm sure Jim was either bi polar, depressed, manic, ADD, or something
whatever you want to call it, and he'd probably resist all and any effort to diagnose and treat it.
In fact, didn't he do just that?





#9 NP

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 11:47 AM

Somethin wrong somethin not quite right.

#10 Schmild_Equator

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 11:54 AM

You can call it being depressed, or you can call it being an intelligent American man.

Either way same result.  rolleyes.gif

#11 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:14 PM

QUOTE (Schmild_Equator @ May 26 2009, 12:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You can call it being depressed, or you can call it being an intelligent American man.

Either way same result.  rolleyes.gif

Well you bring up a valid point,Morrison of high intelligence brought up by a father that probably spoke to him about what the Navy does,like nuclear tests 50 miles off of San Diego with scaled model ships,small nuclear explosion underwater tests. Jim Morrison knew a lot more about Tonkin Bay than most,he knew exactly what the Vietnam war was and who prospered. You can stuff that stuff down in your gut but you pay a price for doing that.Depressed because he knew how the whole entire game was played,I can buy that,depressed because he expressed his thoughts on stage but the audience didn't really get it.

                                           Do you know we are being led to slaughters by placid admirals
                                          And that fat slow generals are getting obscene on young blood?
                    
                                          JDM
                                          


#12 NP

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:28 PM

QUOTE (mojosmoothy @ May 26 2009, 01:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Well you bring up a valid point,Morrison of high intelligence brought up by a father that probably spoke to him about what the Navy does,like nuclear tests 50 miles off of San Diego with scaled model ships,small nuclear explosion underwater tests. Jim Morrison knew a lot more about Tonkin Bay than most,he knew exactly what the Vietnam war was and who prospered. You can stuff that stuff down in your gut but you pay a price for doing that.Depressed because he knew how the whole entire game was played,I can buy that,depressed because he expressed his thoughts on stage but the audience didn't really get it.

                                           Do you know we are being led to slaughters by placid admirals
                                          And that fat slow generals are getting obscene on young blood?
                    
                                          JDM


Are you sure?
Because the people I know with family in the military/government say that their family is encouraged to not bring their work home with them. I don't think its something the Admiral would be talking about with Jim, maybe not even his wife. Those people can be tight lipped. And when you deal with the stuff they do all day and night when you get home you want to escape.

#13 Schmild_Equator

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:36 PM

This is a dymanic that has always fascinated me, the relationship between father and son. Growing up as the "Commander's Son" has to effect a kid, both negative and positive. The Admiral must have been a person with a sense of quiet authority about him, the same as Morrison himself came to have. Even as a young man he was the type of guy who could talk shit to city cops, who could make grown men nervous.

On some level, even if he was unconscious of it, that was military toughness ingrained at an early age.

For me, that was one of the most interesting things about Morrison that was never really explored. Father & Son, both leaders of diametriclly opposite cultures. It's straight out of a Victorian novel.




#14 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:37 PM

QUOTE (NP @ May 26 2009, 01:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Are you sure?
Because the people I know with family in the military/government say that their family is encouraged to not bring their work home with them. I don't think its something the Admiral would be talking about with Jim, maybe not even his wife. Those people can be tight lipped. And when you deal with the stuff they do all day and night when you get home you want to escape.

I'm very sure JIm Morrison was into his Dad's mind and papers,in fact his Dad was weining Jim to be a Navy man.I'm assuming you don't have children.When you have kids you'll find out they know everything,they skulk and sneak and peak and burrow just to hear the parents quarrel,or talk.Jim was in,no question.his early rebellion caused the admiral to give Jim his own floor in the house with his own entrance,in the navy your judged by the way you run your family.Jim knew everything.

#15 NP

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:57 PM

QUOTE (mojosmoothy @ May 26 2009, 01:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm very sure JIm Morrison was into his Dad's mind and papers,in fact his Dad was weining Jim to be a Navy man.I'm assuming you don't have children.When you have kids you'll find out they know everything,they skulk and sneak and peak and burrow just to hear the parents quarrel,or talk.Jim was in,no question.his early rebellion caused the admiral to give Jim his own floor in the house with his own entrance,in the navy your judged by the way you run your family.Jim knew everything.


I think you're probably right. Kids are sneaky.

#16 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 01:00 PM

QUOTE (Schmild_Equator @ May 26 2009, 01:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is a dymanic that has always fascinated me, the relationship between father and son. Growing up as the "Commander's Son" has to effect a kid, both negative and positive. The Admiral must have been a person with a sense of quiet authority about him, the same as Morrison himself came to have. Even as a young man he was the type of guy who could talk shit to city cops, who could make grown men nervous.

On some level, even if he was unconscious of it, that was military toughness ingrained at an early age.

For me, that was one of the most interesting things about Morrison that was never really explored. Father & Son, both leaders of diametriclly opposite cultures. It's straight out of a Victorian novel.

Yes your right on the vain of gold i've been thinking about for years. Jim was a leader like his father and as you know fruit doesn't fall far from the tree. I'll make the presumption now that when Dad was at sea Jim investigated his missions,scraps of paper,and also I might bring up Jim's mom being under much stress with 3 kids eventually may have enjoyed a drink or 2,much like Elvis's beloved mother Satnin.Their is a queer triangulation in the Morrison upbringing that will never really be answered,and when I say queer I don't mean gay,i talk of the old school term. Above all Morrison was anti authority especially when they hassled him,he knew a lot about that and never considered himself on the other side of the tracks,but he went there every day.

#17 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 01:17 PM

QUOTE (NP @ May 26 2009, 01:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think you're probably right. Kids are sneaky.

The little Mojorison looking through his dad's papers at 7 and adding up the meaning while looking at the cover of Time magazine or Life magazine which was in a big format then and very graphic,more than what the T.V. news shows today,and more potent in the still form,bloody dead bodies,stumps.Nothing funny about this ,it truly fucked with the childs head,and Jim's head was fucked with,not with any intent to harm,but through life and circumstance.TS truly

#18 Christie

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 03:10 PM

QUOTE (mojosmoothy @ May 26 2009, 04:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm very sure JIm Morrison was into his Dad's mind and papers,in fact his Dad was weining Jim to be a Navy man.I'm assuming you don't have children.When you have kids you'll find out they know everything,they skulk and sneak and peak and burrow just to hear the parents quarrel,or talk.Jim was in,no question.his early rebellion caused the admiral to give Jim his own floor in the house with his own entrance,in the navy your judged by the way you run your family.Jim knew everything.


Admiral Morrison was, without a doubt, the holder of a high security clearance. Believe me, he did not discuss his work at home. No one who progresses through the ranks as quicky as he did -- at one point he was the youngest admiral ever appointed -- would discuss secure information at home. I doubt he would even bring classified papers home.

Trust me, the military academies are pretty good at drumming into their students the importance of keeping information secure. I know, I live with one. My brother in law, another USNA grad, gave the family copies of a book on submarine maneuvers that was published some years back for Christmas. He told us that he couldn't tell us what his ribbons were for, but some of it was in the book. We still don't know what he did and where he was.

#19 mojosmoothy

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 04:14 PM

QUOTE (Christie @ May 26 2009, 04:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Admiral Morrison was, without a doubt, the holder of a high security clearance. Believe me, he did not discuss his work at home. No one who progresses through the ranks as quicky as he did -- at one point he was the youngest admiral ever appointed -- would discuss secure information at home. I doubt he would even bring classified papers home.

Trust me, the military academies are pretty good at drumming into their students the importance of keeping information secure. I know, I live with one. My brother in law, another USNA grad, gave the family copies of a book on submarine maneuvers that was published some years back for Christmas. He told us that he couldn't tell us what his ribbons were for, but some of it was in the book. We still don't know what he did and where he was.

yeah ,well thats your experience and I know a lot of that is true,however Jim's family made allowances for his uncertain characteristics.I'm not saying Jim had classifyed papers,O.K.,I'm saying through normal father and son fishing trip's and moments of bonding and how a youth sneaks a listen,JIm knew more.Just for instance Tonkin Bay,his Dad's ship is there,oh he probably thought his dad was tuna fishing in Tonkin Bay? He wasn't,Jim was no rube,Jim faced the world head on and got into his own revolution.thats it on what can be said.

#20 mewsical

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 04:17 PM

QUOTE (Christie @ May 26 2009, 04:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Admiral Morrison was, without a doubt, the holder of a high security clearance. Believe me, he did not discuss his work at home. No one who progresses through the ranks as quickly as he did -- at one point he was the youngest admiral ever appointed -- would discuss secure information at home. I doubt he would even bring classified papers home.

Trust me, the military academies are pretty good at drumming into their students the importance of keeping information secure. I know, I live with one. My brother in law, another USNA grad, gave the family copies of a book on submarine maneuvers that was published some years back for Christmas. He told us that he couldn't tell us what his ribbons were for, but some of it was in the book. We still don't know what he did and where he was.


It's the old saying, "Loose lips sink ships."  

At one time, I was working for a subcontractor of the UKAEA under the Official Secrets Act, my mother was working for APRE under the same stricture, and my stepfather was the head buyer for the Concorde, also subject to strict non-disclosure.  We'd always sit down for dinner and one of us would ask, "So, how was your day?" after which we'd all go "Sshh!" and break up laughing.  But we never said what we were doing.

UKAEA - the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority.  We were building the atomic bomb.
APRE - Army Psychological Research Establishment.  I know they were working on germ warfare.  That's all.






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