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The best drummer in rock history?


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#21 rotaryperception

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 02:09 PM

This is the brand new single from Rebel Meets Rebel featuring Darrell Dimebag Abbott on guitar, David Allen Coe on vocals, and Vinnie Paul on drums.    Click the link for a kick ass new song!Link for Nothin' To Lose The song is Macromedia format.   An amazingly heavy guitar solo by Dimebag which is sure to set the trend for this entire decades Rock n Roll.

#22 gotothelight

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 04:55 PM

As interesting as all of this is, perhaps it would be appreciated more on a website dedicated to Mr. Abbott?

#23 rotaryperception

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 08:08 PM

The point is, that next to John Densmore in drumming is Vinnie Paul. Since John has given up the rock kit, Vinnie is now number one. No one should be comparing John Densmore to Charlie Watts. I gave a MP3 example of the drumming of Vinne Paul Abbott to compare to John Densmore. Tell me what you think about the heavy drums instead. I have to mention Dimebag when I mention Vinnie, because those are the rules.

#24 ask me arse

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 03:03 PM

John is definitly in my top 5, Has anyone ever heard of the drummer of the stone roses? Reni, he is one of the most naturally talanted rock drummers in the world but has a legendary lazy work ethic, pete townsend of the who described him as the best drummer he has heard including keith moon, indeed he drummed in a session with the who when john enwhistle(sic?) was alive and blew everyone away.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Wren
1.John Densmore, Ginger Baker
2. Reni
3. John Bonham
4. Cozy Powell






QUOTE(joekidd @ Sep 11 2005, 01:20 PM) View Post
To me, the best drummer in rock history is either John Densmore (The Doors) or Charlie Watts (The Rolling Stones).  Mr. Watts may be a bit sturdier and fuller, but Mr. Densmore is more daring.  Deft and dynamic, propulsive yet poised and patient, intuitive and yet intellectual, fluid and cutting and powerfully precise, Mr. Densmore's drumming turns the "heartbeat" into a matter of commentary.  His drumming is vivid, visceral, and visual, feeling the pulse and scanning the scene at the same time.  He's creative and carries a flair for the dramatic, and yet he's also consistent and hardly self-indulgent.  And like a jazzman, he knows how to be nimble and quick without rushing.  He's almost akin to an ingenious point guard in basketball, the guy who dribbles the rock, dictates the tempo, creates openings in space, shapes sharp angles, and feeds the potent talents of his teammates, spurring them on to new heights above the rim.

While I appreciate and admire the whipping power of Keith Moon (The Who) and the sheer thunder of John Bonham (Led Zeppelin), I believe that rock's best drummers come from a jazz background.  Mr. Densmore, Mr. Watts, Mitch Mitchell (The Jimi Hendrix Experience), and Ginger Baker (Cream) display a sense of intricacy and flexibility that sets them apart.  And of them all, Mr. Densmore seems the most perceptive and intensely engaged.   Personally, I deem him the star of The Doors' Soft Parade album, as he seems to effortlessly and sharply conduct an armada of talent and instrumentation.  He's a maestro providing guidance for an expansive amalgam that would otherwise prove unwieldy and collapse.  And with his fluidly cutting drumming in Shaman's Blues, the listener can definitely tell that he feels Jim Morrison's pain.  

Other Doors tracks in which I believe Mr. Densmore really stands out include the following:

Break on Through: Mr. Densmore's tightly swinging Brazilian bossa nova groove sets the tempo for this propulsive piece, driving the carnal car down the dangerous highway to the transcendent void.  And he expertly spurs Ray Manzarek on during the latter's fiery organ solo up and down the scales.  His whiplash thrashing and deft fills help take Mr. Manzarek to an inspired level of sensation.    

Take It as It Comes:  On this track, Mr. Densmore epitomizes fast-paced fluid precision, setting the tone for a colorful, eclectic psychedelic mix that blends jazz and pop with Polish organ work and California surf guitar.  

The End: The cutting, savage power of Mr. Densmore's drum commentaries bore a hole in the listener's soul, the very abyss that Mr. Morrison leads us down.

When the Music's Over:  His intellectual commentary and tense exchange with Mr. Morrison is nothing short of spooked and proves that Mr. Densmore carries an expert understanding of space in music.  His channeled work on this epic indicates that he could have drummed for Miles Davis or John Coltrane had he not found his way into The Doors.    

Not to Touch the Earth: Simply put, Mr. Densmore drives his bandmates over the edge in this frenzied gallop toward a breathless crescendo.

Summer's Almost Gone: Mr. Densmore's brisk yet delicate drumming imparts the listener with a sense of innocence soon to be lost.

Five to One: Mr. Densmore's primal, thrusting beat set the tone for the leering generational menace of  this composition.  
            
Touch Me: Mr. Densmore is the linchpin in this robust cluster of sensual sounds, the core of a coming orgasm that won't burst prematurely.

Maggie McGill: Mr. Densmore may be from glamorous Los Angeles, but he seems to sense the dirty, bluesy beat of a forlorn Southern hill town.

L.A. Woman: Mr. Densmore's life-sustaining cruise groove is neither too fast nor too slow, and he effectively brings Mr. Mojo Risin' to orgasm late in the composition.

Riders on the Storm: On a track that is in some ways the epitome of jazz-poetry, Mr. Densmore displays some palpable funk in backing Mr. Manzarek's watery, ghostly electric piano solos.  It all adds up to a definitive sensibility for the ambiguous early 1970s.


#25 steeeeeeeve

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:32 PM

HAS ANYONE HEARD OF RUSH?! Neil Peart's the best drummer i've ever heard of. right after him on my list is John Bonham of the legendary band Led Zeppelin.

#26 Kommander Kool

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 11:15 AM

John Densmore
Keith Moon
Ginger Baker
Roger Taylor

#27 Ana

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 07:02 PM

QUOTE(The Keys @ Oct 2 2005, 05:39 PM) View Post

I just don't think Charlie Watts is any special; Carl Palmer is much better. It's the best drummers in the world for me is Palmer and Densmore.
Yeah it feels true, the soft parade is a hymn to drumming.
I think it is probably the album I feel John's interaction with Jim more noticeable, maybe because Ray's keyboard is not so present.



Definitely John Densmore and Carl Palmer


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#28 Mary-Beth

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 08:33 PM

smile.gif I think that John Densmore is a very creative percussionist and one of my favorite.....he was/is extremely inovative and always has been especially talentated and creative in his use of unusal beats...shall we say that he is a very influential rock percussionist that does not limit himself to the norm...but consciously explores all the avenues and possibilities that can creatively accomplish the final audio product that he wants to transmit in his own unique way.
wink.gif Peace,
M-B



#29 onemat

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 10:36 AM

Man I hate questions like this one. It's so hard to name just one. There are so many great drummers, and great for different reasons.  These days, even creating a top 10 list of drummers is hard for me. here's a list of influences I have on my myspace site. They are roughly in the order I got exposed to their work. I can think of dozens of drummers I dig that aren't on this list too.
Here's The Short List:

Rock, Blues and  Jazz
Hal Blaine                                                                    Gene Krupa
Lynn Easton (The Kingsmen)                                         Buddy Rich
Mel Taylor (The Ventures)                                             Joe Morello
Sandy Nelson                                                               Sonny Payne
Ringo                                                                          Jo Jones
Charlie Watts                                                               Philly Joe Jones
John Bonham                                                               Shelly Manne
Mick Fleetwood                                                             Roy McCurdy
Doug Clifford                                                                Elvin Jones
Al Jackson, Jr.                                                              Art Blakey
Pistol Allen                                                                   Bill Goodwin    
Uriel Jones
Sam Lay
Mitch Mitchell
Ginger Baker
John Densmore
Jim Capaldi
Jerry Edmonton
Kenny Jones
Mickey Waller
Aynsley Dunbar
Uncle John Turner
Bobby Columby
Levon Helm
Jim Gordon
Jim Keltner
George Grantham
Jimmy Carl Black
Cozy Powell
Richie Hayward
Steve Ferrone
Bun E Carlos
Liberty Devitto
Max Weinberg
Larrie London
Kenny Aronoff
Charlie Adams
John Molo
Darren Hess (with James McMurtry),
Stanton Moore
Billy Ward

Matt

#30 knowidea

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 02:20 PM

Nice list Matt!

#31 ReBeat

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 11:08 PM

QUOTE(joekidd @ Sep 11 2005, 05:20 AM) View Post

To me, the best drummer in rock history is either John Densmore (The Doors) or Charlie Watts (The Rolling Stones).  Mr. Watts may be a bit sturdier and fuller, but Mr. Densmore is more daring.  Deft and dynamic, propulsive yet poised and patient, intuitive and yet intellectual, fluid and cutting and powerfully precise, Mr. Densmore's drumming turns the "heartbeat" into a matter of commentary.  His drumming is vivid, visceral, and visual, feeling the pulse and scanning the scene at the same time.  He's creative and carries a flair for the dramatic, and yet he's also consistent and hardly self-indulgent.  And like a jazzman, he knows how to be nimble and quick without rushing.  He's almost akin to an ingenious point guard in basketball, the guy who dribbles the rock, dictates the tempo, creates openings in space, shapes sharp angles, and feeds the potent talents of his teammates, spurring them on to new heights above the rim.

While I appreciate and admire the whipping power of Keith Moon (The Who) and the sheer thunder of John Bonham (Led Zeppelin), I believe that rock's best drummers come from a jazz background.  Mr. Densmore, Mr. Watts, Mitch Mitchell (The Jimi Hendrix Experience), and Ginger Baker (Cream) display a sense of intricacy and flexibility that sets them apart.  And of them all, Mr. Densmore seems the most perceptive and intensely engaged.   Personally, I deem him the star of The Doors' Soft Parade album, as he seems to effortlessly and sharply conduct an armada of talent and instrumentation.  He's a maestro providing guidance for an expansive amalgam that would otherwise prove unwieldy and collapse.  And with his fluidly cutting drumming in Shaman's Blues, the listener can definitely tell that he feels Jim Morrison's pain.  

Other Doors tracks in which I believe Mr. Densmore really stands out include the following:

Break on Through: Mr. Densmore's tightly swinging Brazilian bossa nova groove sets the tempo for this propulsive piece, driving the carnal car down the dangerous highway to the transcendent void.  And he expertly spurs Ray Manzarek on during the latter's fiery organ solo up and down the scales.  His whiplash thrashing and deft fills help take Mr. Manzarek to an inspired level of sensation.    

Take It as It Comes:  On this track, Mr. Densmore epitomizes fast-paced fluid precision, setting the tone for a colorful, eclectic psychedelic mix that blends jazz and pop with Polish organ work and California surf guitar.  

The End: The cutting, savage power of Mr. Densmore's drum commentaries bore a hole in the listener's soul, the very abyss that Mr. Morrison leads us down.

When the Music's Over:  His intellectual commentary and tense exchange with Mr. Morrison is nothing short of spooked and proves that Mr. Densmore carries an expert understanding of space in music.  His channeled work on this epic indicates that he could have drummed for Miles Davis or John Coltrane had he not found his way into The Doors.    

Not to Touch the Earth: Simply put, Mr. Densmore drives his bandmates over the edge in this frenzied gallop toward a breathless crescendo.

Summer's Almost Gone: Mr. Densmore's brisk yet delicate drumming imparts the listener with a sense of innocence soon to be lost.

Five to One: Mr. Densmore's primal, thrusting beat set the tone for the leering generational menace of  this composition.  
            
Touch Me: Mr. Densmore is the linchpin in this robust cluster of sensual sounds, the core of a coming orgasm that won't burst prematurely.

Maggie McGill: Mr. Densmore may be from glamorous Los Angeles, but he seems to sense the dirty, bluesy beat of a forlorn Southern hill town.

L.A. Woman: Mr. Densmore's life-sustaining cruise groove is neither too fast nor too slow, and he effectively brings Mr. Mojo Risin' to orgasm late in the composition.

Riders on the Storm: On a track that is in some ways the epitome of jazz-poetry, Mr. Densmore displays some palpable funk in backing Mr. Manzarek's watery, ghostly electric piano solos.  It all adds up to a definitive sensibility for the ambiguous early 1970s.



Agreed Charlie & John all the way. and thanks for the break down on John

#32 Ana

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Posted 12 October 2006 - 07:41 AM

I don't know what's so special about Charlie Watts, he's just average.
And then I don't like the rolling stones.

#33 dark_rimbe

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 03:54 PM

definitelly,our dear friend Densmore is the best drummer in rock stage...& surelly one of the most finest musicians...i'd like his style as his music,his attitude front the comercialization...o prostitution.some people think john was the band member less close to Jim...but finnally the two ends to be so seemly!!!!!!for me he's an example...musical 6 human...
QUOTE(joekidd @ Sep 11 2005, 07:20 AM) View Post
To me, the best drummer in rock history is either John Densmore (The Doors) or Charlie Watts (The Rolling Stones).  Mr. Watts may be a bit sturdier and fuller, but Mr. Densmore is more daring.  Deft and dynamic, propulsive yet poised and patient, intuitive and yet intellectual, fluid and cutting and powerfully precise, Mr. Densmore's drumming turns the "heartbeat" into a matter of commentary.  His drumming is vivid, visceral, and visual, feeling the pulse and scanning the scene at the same time.  He's creative and carries a flair for the dramatic, and yet he's also consistent and hardly self-indulgent.  And like a jazzman, he knows how to be nimble and quick without rushing.  He's almost akin to an ingenious point guard in basketball, the guy who dribbles the rock, dictates the tempo, creates openings in space, shapes sharp angles, and feeds the potent talents of his teammates, spurring them on to new heights above the rim.

While I appreciate and admire the whipping power of Keith Moon (The Who) and the sheer thunder of John Bonham (Led Zeppelin), I believe that rock's best drummers come from a jazz background.  Mr. Densmore, Mr. Watts, Mitch Mitchell (The Jimi Hendrix Experience), and Ginger Baker (Cream) display a sense of intricacy and flexibility that sets them apart.  And of them all, Mr. Densmore seems the most perceptive and intensely engaged.   Personally, I deem him the star of The Doors' Soft Parade album, as he seems to effortlessly and sharply conduct an armada of talent and instrumentation.  He's a maestro providing guidance for an expansive amalgam that would otherwise prove unwieldy and collapse.  And with his fluidly cutting drumming in Shaman's Blues, the listener can definitely tell that he feels Jim Morrison's pain.  

Other Doors tracks in which I believe Mr. Densmore really stands out include the following:

Break on Through: Mr. Densmore's tightly swinging Brazilian bossa nova groove sets the tempo for this propulsive piece, driving the carnal car down the dangerous highway to the transcendent void.  And he expertly spurs Ray Manzarek on during the latter's fiery organ solo up and down the scales.  His whiplash thrashing and deft fills help take Mr. Manzarek to an inspired level of sensation.    

Take It as It Comes:  On this track, Mr. Densmore epitomizes fast-paced fluid precision, setting the tone for a colorful, eclectic psychedelic mix that blends jazz and pop with Polish organ work and California surf guitar.  

The End: The cutting, savage power of Mr. Densmore's drum commentaries bore a hole in the listener's soul, the very abyss that Mr. Morrison leads us down.

When the Music's Over:  His intellectual commentary and tense exchange with Mr. Morrison is nothing short of spooked and proves that Mr. Densmore carries an expert understanding of space in music.  His channeled work on this epic indicates that he could have drummed for Miles Davis or John Coltrane had he not found his way into The Doors.    

Not to Touch the Earth: Simply put, Mr. Densmore drives his bandmates over the edge in this frenzied gallop toward a breathless crescendo.

Summer's Almost Gone: Mr. Densmore's brisk yet delicate drumming imparts the listener with a sense of innocence soon to be lost.

Five to One: Mr. Densmore's primal, thrusting beat set the tone for the leering generational menace of  this composition.  
            
Touch Me: Mr. Densmore is the linchpin in this robust cluster of sensual sounds, the core of a coming orgasm that won't burst prematurely.

Maggie McGill: Mr. Densmore may be from glamorous Los Angeles, but he seems to sense the dirty, bluesy beat of a forlorn Southern hill town.

L.A. Woman: Mr. Densmore's life-sustaining cruise groove is neither too fast nor too slow, and he effectively brings Mr. Mojo Risin' to orgasm late in the composition.

Riders on the Storm: On a track that is in some ways the epitome of jazz-poetry, Mr. Densmore displays some palpable funk in backing Mr. Manzarek's watery, ghostly electric piano solos.  It all adds up to a definitive sensibility for the ambiguous early 1970s.



#34 lost little girl

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 12:09 AM

JOHN DENSMORE is THE KING OF THE DRUMS.
and i am not saying that just cos i am a Doors fan..
John has skills, John has methods, John has techniqes..JOHN IS THE BEST..
i was carefully watching his drumming on a lot of live performances..and i was amazed..
JOHN WILL ALWAYS BE MY NUMBER ONE.

great drummer, hm...i can consider KEITH MOON smile.gif
Keith is a very good drummer, i think we can all agree.
his solos are great.

BUT MR. JOHN DENSMORE IS THE KING..AND FROM HIS PEDESTAL, HE WILL NEVER LEAVE!!!!!!!!!!

Love ya John!!!!

#35 Nora

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 11:18 AM

Agreed

#36 lost little girl

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 10:49 PM

QUOTE(Nora @ Oct 19 2007, 07:18 PM) View Post
Agreed

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#37 elshaman

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 01:30 PM

so much standars...
bonham goes to the top IMO




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